Filtering by: Film Exhibitions
 Film London Jarman Award: A Journey Through the First Decade  (15 May- 10 June)
May
15
to Jun 10

Film London Jarman Award: A Journey Through the First Decade (15 May- 10 June)

feature_UrsulaMayerGONDA2012.jpg

Whitechapel Gallery| 15 May-10 June

Tickets and information here


Film London Jarman Award: A Journey through the First Decade is an exhibition celebrating 10 years of the Jarman Award, promising a unique insight into the work of the UK's leading artist filmmakers. The free exhibition celebrates the innovation and evolution of one of today's most exciting artforms, extensively covering the Award's first ten years. 

View Event →

Windrush, 1948 - 2018  (Phoenix Cinema, Sunday 20 May)
May
20
2:00 PM14:00

Windrush, 1948 - 2018 (Phoenix Cinema, Sunday 20 May)

feature_windrush.JPG

Phoenix Cinema| 20 May| 2pm

Tickes and details here

This interactive audio-visual presentation by Tony Warner of Black History Walks will examine the fight for equal rights in housing, education, employment, immigration and law since 1948. The issues covered will include the Notting Hill riots, Black women leaders, Black heroes of World War 2 and much more.

View Event →
 Shoot Shoot Shoot: The London Film-Makers’ Co-operative 1966-76 at Tate Britain (25 April – 17 July)
Apr
25
to Jul 17

Shoot Shoot Shoot: The London Film-Makers’ Co-operative 1966-76 at Tate Britain (25 April – 17 July)

The London Film-Makers’ Co-operative holds a very unique place in London film history, one which will be celebrated this year by the Tate Britain through a selection of documents, ephemera and films from the period.

For the uninitiated: The LFMC was founded in October 1966 as a non-commercial distributor of avant-garde cinema. In contrast to similar groups that emerged around the world, it grew to incorporate a distribution service, cinema space and film lab. Filmmakers were able to control every aspect of the creative process, allowing them to explore the material aspects of celluloid and experiment with multiple projection and performance-based ‘expanded cinema’ outside of the mainstream market.  

The original group of film enthusiasts would meet in the basement of the Better Books shop on Charing Cross Road. Its founding members, including Bob Cobbing, Ray Durgnat, Simon Hartog, John Latham and Stephen Dwoskin, were inspired by filmmakers like Jonas Mekas and the New American Cinema Group in New York, who had established their own non-profit distribution cooperative in 1962. The closure of the bookshop the following year led to LFMC screenings relocating to the Drury Lane Arts Lab, until it found a more permanent base at the New Arts Lab on Drummond Street, near Euston Station.

Starting with working in avant-garde cinema, the LFMC also moved into published its own journal, Cinim. More filmmakers joined, including Malcolm Le Grice, Fred Drummond and David Curtis, and the LFMC eventually built its own film laboratory, a workshop for printing and processing 16mm film. This allowed experimental film to be experienced and experimented with first-hand, keeping the LFMC at the heart of independent film culture in London (including screenings and rentals) and the world for decades- though relying on run-down buildings provided by Camden Council in Kentish Town and Primrose Hill. The LFMC eventually folded in 2002, but it lives on in a new organisation: LUX, which continues to be the UK’s leading agency for the support and promotion of artists’ moving image.

The Tate exhibition is at Archive Gallery, Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1P 4RG
25 April – 17 July 2016.

View Event →
Chantal Akerman Now Exhibition (Ambika P3,30 October–6 December 2015)
Oct
30
to Dec 6

Chantal Akerman Now Exhibition (Ambika P3,30 October–6 December 2015)

CHANTAL AKERMAN NOW, running at Ambika P3, will be the first major English-speaking world exhibition of work by the late Chantal Akerman, the internationally celebrated filmmaker and artist. NOW runs from from 30 October–6 December 2015 and will coincide with the UK premiere of her new film, No Home Movie (2015), on Friday 30 October at Regent Street Cinema, London. No Home Movieis a video essay about her mother, Natalia, an Auschwitz survivor who died in 2014, and whose anxieties were an ongoing concern in Akerman’s work.

Details:
 
CHANTAL AKERMAN NOW
30 October — 6 December 2015
Ambika P3
Address: 35 Marylebone Road, NW1 5LS
Admission Free
Opening hours: Tuesday–Fri, 11am–7pm, Sat–Sun, 12pm–6pm
Nearest Tube: Baker Street
Telephone: +44 (0)20 7911 5876
Email: p3.exhibitions@wmin.ac.uk
Website: www.p3exhibitions.com


EVENTS:

No Home Movie (2015), 115 minutes – UK première
Friday 30 October 2015, 7.30pm
Regent Street Cinema.
Tickets at www.regentstreetcinema.com, booking essential

View Event →
"The View from Here" - The British Council's Film Exhibition (4 August - 24 September) collects progadanda films of yesteryear
Aug
3
to Sep 24

"The View from Here" - The British Council's Film Exhibition (4 August - 24 September) collects progadanda films of yesteryear


View From Here: The British Council Film Collection 
(4 August – 24 September 2014)
British Council HQ, 10 Spring Gardens, London, SW1A 2BN (MAP LINK)

Opening Hours
Monday to Friday: 9.30–18.00
Saturday and Sunday: 12.00–16.00
Free of charge. No booking required


View From Here is a new interactive exhibition exploring the British Council's Film Collection. The Film Collection is made up of dozens of archive films that were commissioned to show 'the best of Britishness' in a bygone era. During the 1940s the British Council commissioned these 100 or so cultural propaganda films that covered all aspects of UK life. The idea was to distribute them all over the world,  so as to create a positive image of Britain as a pleasant place to live.

Tying in with the exhibition at their HQ,  the Council has put the entire Collection now online (you can see them here), and the new exhibition features original production materials as well as three newly-commissioned short films inspired by the Collection by filmmakers John Akomfrah, Mark Cousins and Penny Woolcock .

A brief history of the collection.

---

From the British Council Site:

August 2014 | British Council, Spring Gardens, London SW1
View From Here, a new interactive exhibition exploring the British Council Film Collection, kicks off from Monday 4 August. Featuring archive films from the 1940s, a wealth of background information and the premiere of three newly-commissioned short films - keep reading to find out how to WIN an invite to our exclusive Private View.

View From Here, a new exhibition exploring the British Council Film Collection of archive films showing UK life in a bygone era, opens at the British Council’s London headquarters on Monday 4 August.


During the 1940s the British Council commissioned over 100 cultural propaganda films that covered all aspects of UK life. Distributed all over the world, they were seen by millions and left an indelible impression of Britain as a green and pleasant land.

With the entire Collection now online (you can see them here), this new exhibition featuring original production materials - as well as three newly-commissioned short films inspired by the Collection by filmmakers John Akomfrah, Mark Cousins and Penny Woolcock - highlights the themes, cinematography and individuals that shaped this image of Britain.

There were 112 films produced from the late 1930s to early 1950s in the original Collection, produced in the early years of the British Council and designed to project the 'best of Britishness' to audiences in embassies, consulates and classrooms around the world at a time of global conflict. All are now online giving a rare glimpse into aspects of UK life ranging from England’s pubs and Sheffield’s steel industry to London’s preparations for war, our health, education and justice systems, alongside obsessions with tea, cricket and the British bobby.

About the Commissions:

Mark Cousins’ But Then Again, Too Few to Mention: A Life of Bob
The film takes as its starting point images of the children portrayed in the Collection to imagine a touching story of one simple man.

Penny Woolcock’s Jerusalem
This film uses repetition to explore the difference between the Britain portrayed by the films and the one that actually existed.

John Akomfrah’s The Silence
Using the Collection film Education Of The Deaf (1946) as its narrative spine, The Silence explores the implication of lives lived in silence, through multiple strands of one central life.

Exhibition Details


View From Here: The British Council Film Collection 
(4 August – 24 September 2014)
British Council HQ, 10 Spring Gardens, London, SW1A 2BN (MAP LINK)


Opening Hours
Monday to Friday: 9.30–18.00
Saturday and Sunday: 12.00–16.00
Free of charge. No booking required

Guided tours
A tour of the exhibition, conducted by one of the exhibition curators, will take place every Friday at midday for the duration of the exhibition. Tours have a capacity of 20 people and you can book your place by emailing ViewFromHere@britishcouncil.org. Tours will last approximately 30 minutes and are free of charge.


View Event →
Event: Film 4 Summer Screen Prints Film Poster Exhibition
Jul
31
to Aug 25

Event: Film 4 Summer Screen Prints Film Poster Exhibition


31 July – 25 August 2014

Open daily 10.00–18.00

Additionally from 18.30–21.00 to Film4 Summer Screen ticket holders (7–20 August)

West Wing Galleries, West Wing
Free admission. 
Details here


Lovers of fan art  and perusers of sites like Mondo Tees, rejoice! Here is your chance to buy limited-edition prints inspired by each film shown at Film4 Summer Screen.

Back for a second year, Film4 Summer Screen at Somerset House has commissioned Dalston based studios, Print Club London to curate a series of contemporary screen-printed film posters for the 10 year anniversary season.

On display are an assortment of styles and artists, including Rose Blake, Hattie Stewart, Kate Moross, Steve Wilson, Kate Gibb and HelloVon. Each exhibiting artist will reimagine a poster for one of the films in this season’s line-up.

Each film poster will be a limited-edition and exclusively available to buy for £45 from the exhibition at Somerset House.


View Event →
Dennis Hopper: The Lost Album at the RA
Jun
28
to Oct 19

Dennis Hopper: The Lost Album at the RA


 Dennis Hopper in 1964s cult classic indie Easy Rider, which he wrote, directed and starred in.

Dennis Hopper in 1964s cult classic indie Easy Rider, which he wrote, directed and starred in.

Dennis Hopper - The Lost Album

Runs 26 June-19 October

RA, London


To many, he is the drifter looking for and failing to find the America of his dreams in the cult indie cinema film 1967 Easy Rider, the frazzled reporter in Coppola’s Apocalypse Now, and the gas-guzzling monster Frank Booth in David Lynch’s suburban nightmare Blue Velvet. His long career crossed generations, meaning he worked alongside James Dean in one decade, and Keanu Reeves several later. He tried his hand at directing, which brought him lifelong acclaim in the case of Easy Rider (which he also starred in and co-wrote with Peter Fonda and Terry Southern), but in the case of The Last Movie ended in disastrous results. He probably would admit to doing a lot of work for hire, and certainly would admit to living a life of excess that pushed opportunities away from him. 

But actor, writer and director Dennis Hopper (1936-2010) was alongside all this, also a talented and committed photographer, and his body of work in this field is now being acknowledged by no less an institution than the Royal Academy of Arts. The exhibition, Dennis Hopper: The Lost Album features a collection of the actor's photographs, over 400, that had been unseen since 1970. It runs until 19 October.

The photographs in the show, called The Lost Album, were taken between 1961-67, when Hopper was on the outs in Hollywood. They were exhibited in 1970, at the Fort Worth Art Center in Texas, before being boxed up by Hopper and more or less forgotten until their recent unearthing by his daughter Marion.

Dennis Hopper will also be celebrated by a month long season at the BFI: Icon of Oblivion.

You can read a preview of the show by the Guardian’s Mark Brown here


View Event →