Exhibition Review: Tacita Dean: Portrait; Still Life review (National Portrait Gallery; National Gallery, London to 28 May)

 Prisoner Pair Tacita Dean 2008Courtesy the artist, Frith Street Gallery, London and Marian Goodman Gallery, New York/Paris

Prisoner Pair
Tacita Dean
2008Courtesy the artist, Frith Street Gallery, London and Marian Goodman Gallery, New York/Paris

National Portait Gallery and National Gallery to 28 May.

National Portrait Gallery details

National Gallery details

RATING:  ★★★★★

Thanks to a collaboration between the National Gallery, National Portrait Gallery and the Royal Academy, each of these esteem institutions over the next few months will host exhibitions from renowned British European artist Tacita Dean, with the National and NPG first up with STILL LIFE and PORTRAIT respectively. This weekend of 25-27 May is therefore really your last chance to catch the first two of the three planned linked exhibitions (the RA's started 19 May and runs to 12 August). Film lovers should make a beeline for this, as 16mm projections lie at the core of the National and NPG's exhibitions, with Dean having long been interested in exploring genres like still life and portraiture but through the medium of film instead of paint. The whirr of 16mm dominates both exhibitions, with Dean seemingly having designed many of the film installation rooms with the intention of making contact with the beam of light unavoidable, a reminder of film's mechanics and physical presence. Some of the film's are projected onto screens that hang from wires so tiny that in the darkened rooms they seem to be floating portals that you might reach through back into the time and place of the on-screen action.

In the quiet of the National Gallery and the NPGs exhibition halls, and in particular when sitting in the rooms devoted to Dean's film still life and portraits (though each exhibition compares and contrasts the film works with photographs and paintings curated by Dean from her own collections or various other galleries and sources), a ruminative and elegiac atmosphere prevails. Aside from being challenged to parse a personality from the various tics and mannerisms of Dean's chosen subjects for the portraits (which includes actors David Warner, Ben Whishaw and Stephen Dillane, and artists David Hockney and Cy Twombley) and having the chance fall under the hypnotic spell of watching a largely still figure hold the screen as a projector whirrs rhymtically behind you, what Dean's portraits encourage is a contemplation of time. Not just the amount of time each film runs for, but also 'film time' (how much time is passing in each portrait, some seem to cover seasons, others a day in the life of an artist with activities both mundane and creative) and the fact that film as as medium relies on the passing of time, or the passing of frames through light at a set speed, to work. You can even get up and look at the 16mm film running through the projectors in many of the rooms. And, finally, the subjects of the films themselves often suggest the inevitability of degradation or give off a distinct autumnal vibe; with Twombly and Hockey both slowing figures in their 80s, and one film in the Still Life series covering the slow alteration of two apples in a schnapps bottle. 

Watching the films and reading the supporting text might also trigger you into contemplating how manipulating the physical nature of celluloid can allow for new realities  and effects to be created on screen: Dean's "His Picture in Little" (a tiny, intense projection of the sittings of three former Hamlet actors Dillane, Warner and Whishaw which emerges onto one of the NPGs wall spaces) splices together three different shoots from three different time periods, all done via masking of the film and not digital manipulation. "His Picture in Little" is one of the new works on display and perhaps the highlight, being an homage to the tradition of tiny portraiture painting that harks back to the Shakespearean period and with examples of original art pieces from the time mounted alongside the film. Typical of Dean, this is a lost art form reclaimed for her show; she seems eternally curious about things that are about to vanish.

Comment

Owen Van Spall

Greetings. I am a Film History MA graduate from Birkbeck University of London and a trained NCTJ qualified journalist. Apart from a long history of film and news writing for this site and various other publications, I am also a trained photographer with my own camera kit. I write mostly every day. Along the way I have picked up work experience at Sight & Sound, The Guardian, The Independent, The FT, The New Statesman, and more. I have written hard news stories, features, arranged and conducted interviews with celebrities, film directors and other major cultural figures, arranged photo shoots, and covered film festivals, conferences and events in the UK and abroad. If you wish to commission me or enquire about full-time opportunities please find my CV and contact details below. A physical portfolio of print only cuttings can also be provided.

Event Review: Daydreaming with Stanley Kubrick Exhibition at Somerset House

Tying in nicely with the upcoming 4k digital re-release of Stanley Kubrick’s underrated masterpiece Barry Lyndon (which Smoke Screen will be covering, watch this space), Somerset House this month unveiled a new exhibition - Daydreaming with Stanley Kubrick - curated by Mo’Wax and UNKLE founder, artist and musician James Lavelle, featuring a host of contemporary artists, film makers and musicians showcasing works inspired by the revered filmmaker. The Smoke Screen, long a worshipper at the feet of the master director, could not resist taking a peek.

It is important to note that this is NOT an exhibition showcasing artefacts or substantial amounts of footage from Kubrick’s films. For that, you are advised to head to the Kubrick Archives at the London College of Communication (UAL), or get yourself a Kubrick boxset. Instead, Daydreaming is based on the concept of participating artists responding to a film, scene, character or theme from the Kubrick archives, and then putting forward new perspectives onto the director’s lifework. In concert with this, James Lavelle collaborated with contemporary musicians and composers to produce a soundtrack to some of the installations. Also worth bearing in mind is not all of the works on display here are newly commissioned, some, like Jane and Louise Wilson’s exploration of Kubrick’s unmade films, have been seen before.

Such a diverse collection of works inevitably means the experience is a bit of a mixed bag in terms of impact. Some works seem either a bit too obscure, or on the flipside, too prosaic, to really translate the epic transcendent heights that the best of Kubrick’s work could reach. Political artist Peter Kennard’s contribution - Trident: A Strange Love 2013-2016 - juxtaposes images of characters set in the War Room of Dr Strangelove with present day leaders of nuclear states - but this is a bit of an obvious take to go for and doesn’t exploit the glorious black comedy vibe and intricate world building of the film. Mat Chiver’s Eye sculpture, which is based on a reflection seen in the eye of astronaut David Bowman in 2001 in one scene, just feels too offbeat and uninspired when you finally see it sitting there inert on the floor. Likewise, Gavin Turk’s tabletop sculpture - The Shining-  a work that recreates the Shining’s maze in silver reflective surfaces to scale, feels lacking inthe all-encompassing menace that the film;s full scale counterpart as imbued with. On the other hand, Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard’s Requiem for 114 Radios, which sees the artists fill a room with dismantled radios and clocks, fees like a neat allegory for the inside of Kubrick’s mind. He loved technology, and could spend forever and a day taking things apart to see how they worked.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, given what a visual titan Kubrick was, it is the installations that use film footage themselves that seem better able to transmit that special ‘Kubrickian ‘ vibe. The outstanding contribution to the show comes from Jane and Louise Wilson with their film Unfolding the Aryan Papers. This film is as much about a film that never happened as it is a portrait of lead actress Johanna ter Steege, and was built from time spent in Kubrick’s vast archives. Johanna ter Steege was cast as the lead in Kubrick’s great unfinished exploration of the Holocaust, The Aryan Papers, a film which consumed years of his life in research, and was eventually abandoned in pre-production. The installation film begins with images of Johanna taken in 1993 by Stanley Kubrick - they are of the wardrobe shoot for the film. Johanna was to play the lead role of Tania, a Polish Jew trying to save herself and her family from the Nazis. Intercut between stills of Johanna are images from the archive of specific scenes Kubrick wanted to recreate, including harrowing images captured from the jewish ghettos and war zones from WWII, and images from the Ealing Studios Archive of interiors, shot in 1939/40. The film moves into live action with footage of Johanna filmed now, fifteen years later, where she appears to come to life, recreating stills from the original wardrobe shoot. It is both a powerful tribute to Kubrick’s desire for authenticity and his hunger for information, and a haunting exploration of the great tragedy of the Holocaust. Implicit in the film is the idea of it being ultimately impossible to ever sum up such a tragedy into a singular film. It was a subject that was too much even for a filmmaker like Kubrick to hammer into shape: the experience apparently left him deeply depressed.

Actress and filmmaker Samantha Morton’s Anywhere out of this World turns out to be one of the more compelling video pieces, because it feels so straight-forwardly personal. The short film sees a young girl, who seems to be fleeing a background of abuse, flee to the sanctity of a near-empty cinema during matinee hours (in real life this is the gorgeous Phoenix Cinema in north London). After messing about in the back row, bored, the girl is soon immersed against her expectations by the film that starts playing: Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey. Morton’s film overcranks the sound effects of the cinema operation, with the curtain’s slide back set to a roar, as if it was the space ship in the film, suggesting the transportive effect of Kubrick’s work. The camera holds on the young girl’s face as she watches astronaut bowman fall into the star gate in the film’s famous surreal light sequence: what is she thinking? Is this a brief window of respite from what seems like a harsh home life? Is this a life changing moment? It turns out that this is a semi-autobiographical tale from Morton’s troubled childhood, and like the best of Kubrick’s work, is it both touching and troubling, complicated and extremely straightforward, all at the same time.

Daydreaming with Stanley Kubrick runs 6 July – 24 August 2016

www.daydreamingwith.com
#dreamkubrick

Open daily 10.00 – 18.00 (last admission 17.00)

Late night Wednesdays & Thursdays on 20, 21, 27 & 28 July until 21.00
(last admission 20.00)

West Wing Galleries, West Wing

£12.50/£9.50 concessions

BOOK TICKETS NOW

Advance tickets must be booked by 23.59 the day prior to your visit.

Tickets can be purchased in person from the admissions desk on the day. 

Comment

Owen Van Spall

Greetings. I am a Film History MA graduate from Birkbeck University of London and a trained NCTJ qualified journalist. Apart from a long history of film and news writing for this site and various other publications, I am also a trained photographer with my own camera kit. I write mostly every day. Along the way I have picked up work experience at Sight & Sound, The Guardian, The Independent, The FT, The New Statesman, and more. I have written hard news stories, features, arranged and conducted interviews with celebrities, film directors and other major cultural figures, arranged photo shoots, and covered film festivals, conferences and events in the UK and abroad. If you wish to commission me or enquire about full-time opportunities please find my CV and contact details below. A physical portfolio of print only cuttings can also be provided.

Celebrating the The London Film-Makers’ Co-operative at BFI and Tate this season

The London Film-Makers’ Co-operative holds a very unique place in London film history, one which will be celebrated this year by the Tate Britain through a selection of documents, ephemera and films from the period.

For the uninitiated: The LFMC was founded in October 1966 as a non-commercial distributor of avant-garde cinema. In contrast to similar groups that emerged around the world, it grew to incorporate a distribution service, cinema space and film lab. Filmmakers were able to control every aspect of the creative process, allowing them to explore the material aspects of celluloid and experiment with multiple projection and performance-based ‘expanded cinema’ outside of the mainstream market.  

The original group of film enthusiasts would meet in the basement of the Better Books shop on Charing Cross Road. Its founding members, including Bob Cobbing, Ray Durgnat, Simon Hartog, John Latham and Stephen Dwoskin, were inspired by filmmakers like Jonas Mekas and the New American Cinema Group in New York, who had established their own non-profit distribution cooperative in 1962. The closure of the bookshop the following year led to LFMC screenings relocating to the Drury Lane Arts Lab, until it found a more permanent base at the New Arts Lab on Drummond Street, near Euston Station.

Starting with working in avant-garde cinema, the LFMC also moved into published its own journal, Cinim. More filmmakers joined, including Malcolm Le Grice, Fred Drummond and David Curtis, and the LFMC eventually built its own film laboratory, a workshop for printing and processing 16mm film. This allowed experimental film to be experienced and experimented with first-hand, keeping the LFMC at the heart of independent film culture in London (including screenings and rentals) and the world for decades- though relying on run-down buildings provided by Camden Council in Kentish Town and Primrose Hill. The LFMC eventually folded in 2002, but it lives on in a new organisation: LUX, which continues to be the UK’s leading agency for the support and promotion of artists’ moving image.

The BFI have also been running a series of film programmes programmed by the actual filmmakers who were part of the organisation: LFMC50, a monthly programme, in partnership with BFI Southbank, curated by the original Co-op cinema programmers (David Curtis, Peter Gidal, Annabel Nicolson, Lis Rhodes, Deke Dusinberre (the next one is LFMC 50: Taking the Time on 24 May, from guest curator Deke Dusinberre). May 2016 also sees the BFI launch Crossing the Threshold: Experimental films and live performances from Malcolm Le Grice, one of the the filmmakers in the LFC who began in the underground scene of London and is well known for reconfiguring images through 16mm printing treatments, looping and other manipulations.

You can search the BFI Shop’s LFMC books and DVDs here.

The Tate exhibition is at Archive Gallery, Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1P 4RG
25 April – 17 July 2016.

 

Comment

Owen Van Spall

Greetings. I am a Film History MA graduate from Birkbeck University of London and a trained NCTJ qualified journalist. Apart from a long history of film and news writing for this site and various other publications, I am also a trained photographer with my own camera kit. I write mostly every day. Along the way I have picked up work experience at Sight & Sound, The Guardian, The Independent, The FT, The New Statesman, and more. I have written hard news stories, features, arranged and conducted interviews with celebrities, film directors and other major cultural figures, arranged photo shoots, and covered film festivals, conferences and events in the UK and abroad. If you wish to commission me or enquire about full-time opportunities please find my CV and contact details below. A physical portfolio of print only cuttings can also be provided.

The Lost Photographer: Dennis Hopper's Photographs at the Royal Academy

 Uneasy Rider: Dennis Hopper's photographs were taken at a time when he was blacklisted by Hollywood

Uneasy Rider: Dennis Hopper's photographs were taken at a time when he was blacklisted by Hollywood



Given how his hell-raising antics in many ways came to overshadow the image of his career on both sides of the camera (they certainly influenced many of his performances and casting decisions), it might surprise those who go to Dennis Hopper’s photographs at the Royal Academy show to see how little of ‘wild man Hopper’ is evident in the work. This is the actor after all who was cast — after a long period away from Hollywood - as the nitrous oxide-guzzling, unhinged kingpin Frank Booth in David Lynch’s Blue Velvet because, in his own words: “I am Frank Booth”. This is the man who once pulled a knife on actor Rip Torn - only to have Torn yank it out of his hand and turn it on him. Apart from Blue Velvet, any Hopper ‘best of’ list would surely lean towards the more extreme performances, such as his strung-out turn in Apocalypse Now as a deranged photographer (drawing on his actual experiences- it is tempting to think), or a younger generation might connect more with his bug-eyed, bomb expert-turned-terrorist in Speed

dennis-hopper-royal-acade-008.jpg

Yet, instead of a set of blurred shots capturing crazy nights, drugs and guns, Hopper’s photographs showcase a striking sense of composition; real forethought in the framing of people, landscapes and architecture. The visual style is surprisingly modest, and Hopper himself is hardly in any of them. Though some are playful and irreverent, there is not much of a sense of these being rushed, on-the-fly street photographs, though Hopper certainly was on the move a lot during this period all across the streets of the US, and beyond in Mexico. They are clearly the work of someone giving careful thought to what he was seeing and doing.

The exhibition, titled “The Lost Album”, showcases more than 400 of the actor's favourite photographs. All were taken between 1961-67, when Hopper was effectively blacklisted by Hollywood. They were exhibited once before, in 1970 at the Fort Worth Art Centre in Texas. But after this, they were boxed up by Hopper and more or less forgotten until his daughter Marin Hopper discovered the boxes after her father's death in 2010. The exhibition actually only shows a small percentage of the photography work Hopper generated in this time period, in total he took around 18,000 pictures with his Nikon F.  

Hopper’s work can be enjoyed as a simple, personal visual diary of the diversity of the American landscape in the 1960s. Hopper seems to have been the roaming sort, taking his camera from the LA art scene to Montgomery Alabama, and then on to Mexico. Architecture seems to have interested him, and there are many carefully composed shots of some of LA’s more eye-catching buildings like the Frank Lloyd Wright house. The abstract photographic potential of buildings and landscapes was also something Hopper was clearly drawn to, with much of this work focused on isolating specific elements: shadows, patterns and consumer logos. The more abstract photographs are perhaps the most surprising of the show. But if you want “Americana”, you could do worse than Hopper’s appealingly cluttered, wide angle photograph of gas station signs and traffic through both a car’s front and rear view mirrors in “Double Standard” from 1961.

The cultural richness and diversity of American art scene in the 1960s, particularly in LA, also comes through; a melting pot of raw artistic talent, showbiz, surface-level sheen, and undeniable glamour. Hopper seems to have been in with the right crowd: Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenburg, Jasper Johns, Marcel Duchamp and David Hockney all were captured by his lens. Hopper himself had an interest in art: as a collector, painter and sculptor. Surprisingly few film stars feature, but the effortlessly handsome Paul Newman and a newly-wed Jane Fonda turn up. Hopper had his own milestone to plant in the history of the American arts with his 1969 directorial debut Easy Rider, which helped jumpstart up the US indie film scene as Hollywood reeled from falling revenues and anti monopoly legislation, with TV eating into their box office. But this would come after he hung up the camera.

The creative waves of 1960s America were counterbalanced by incredible turmoil, which seems to have drawn Hopper out of LA. One particular section of the show is devoted to his photographs from the time spent tracking Martin Luther King's Selma to Montgomery march: black faces framed against American flags, tears gas clouds, burly cops. It makes a certain sense that Hopper would go to where the outsiders were gathering; even before Easy Rider immortalised him as the wandering American loner searching for an ideal country that probably never existed, his role in  Rebel Without a Cause alongside James Dean had been a lesson in how rebellion could be an art form. Though it is unlikely he shared their particular brand of outsider politics, Hopper also took his camera along to Hell’s Angel’s gatherings, and it is tempting to see the appeal of the freedom offered by the heavy-duty Harley bleeding into Easy Rider. Hopper, like the bikers, had been drawn to the image of freedom offered by ‘the West’, having been born in Kansas and starred in several westerns.

Viewers are well advised to pick up the gallery guide when visiting, as it contains an excellent essay by Andrea Tarsia, useful for those wanting to go beyond the chronological start and end of the gallery. There is background information on how James Dean was influential encouraging Hopper to experiment with photography, and how Hopper’s time on the set of The Sons of Katie Elder in Durango, Mexico, where some of the show’s photographs were taken, gave him the first inspirations to start preparing the meta-western The Last Movie - his 1971 directorial effort that was a commercial and critical disaster and again led to Hopper falling outside the Hollywood system. Many of the faces from the LA art scene that Hopper captured with his camera are also given a backstory by Tarsia,

Tarsia suggests Hopper’s work be viewed through the lens of the American tradition that spans the work of photographers like Dorothea Lange and Gordon Parks, Robert Frank and his record of life on the road in The Americans, and the street and social landscapes photography of Lee Friedlander and Garry Winogrand. Tarsia also notes the importance of Easy Rider as epitomising “A new cinematic genre — the road movie — in which life on the open road both defines a quintessential American experience and symbolises an escape from it.”

She places the film in the same ranks as Bonnie and Clyde (1967) and Midnight Cowboy (1969) as launching what has been called the New American Hollywood of the 1970s. Easy Rider stood out through its frequent use of jump cuts and flashbacks, the fact that it featured explicit drug taking, and boasted a popular rock soundtrack. Given the photographs that have come before it, it feels right that the Royal Academy’s Hopper show ends with projected extracts of that now iconic film on the gallery wall, Hopper and Peter Fonda riding their low-slung bikes along the empty highways. It is tempting to see Easy Rider as the logical endpoint of that hunger to wander, to search, that Dennis Hopper’s photographs evoke.



Comment

Owen Van Spall

Greetings. I am a Film History MA graduate from Birkbeck University of London and a trained NCTJ qualified journalist. Apart from a long history of film and news writing for this site and various other publications, I am also a trained photographer with my own camera kit. I write mostly every day. Along the way I have picked up work experience at Sight & Sound, The Guardian, The Independent, The FT, The New Statesman, and more. I have written hard news stories, features, arranged and conducted interviews with celebrities, film directors and other major cultural figures, arranged photo shoots, and covered film festivals, conferences and events in the UK and abroad. If you wish to commission me or enquire about full-time opportunities please find my CV and contact details below. A physical portfolio of print only cuttings can also be provided.

Summer Screen Prints sale launches ahead of Film4 Summer Screen

 The West Wing Gallery

The West Wing Gallery


31 July – 25 August 2014
West Wing Galleries, West Wing, Somerset House
Free admission


Film4 Summer Screen, one of London's more popular outdoor film festivals, will be kicking off from 7 August at the usual venue of Somerset House. Tying in with this is Summer Screen Prints: a set of limited-edition screen-printed posters inspired by each film shown at Film4 Summer Screen. Each one is crafted by a different creator, commissioned with Print Club London. Smoke Screen was at the preview of the Somerset House gallery exhibition on 30 July, in order to grab a Royal Tenebaums print, and provide your eyes with a taster of what you can buy below. 

The prints are available from the Somerset House West Wing gallery.  Prints are also available to buy online here.

  Caspar Williamson  -  GHOSTBUSTERS

Caspar Williamson - GHOSTBUSTERS

  Joe Wilson  -  A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS

Joe Wilson - A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS

  Concepción Studios  -  THE ROYAL TENENBAUMS

Concepción Studios - THE ROYAL TENENBAUMS

From the  Somerset House Site - CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATORS AND THEIR FILM TITLES:

Rose Blake
E.T. THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL
Born in London, Rose studied at Kingston and the RCA. Her bold playful work is inspired by music, the art world and the relationship between things. She has worked for clients including bbc.co.uk, Random House and Converse. She is also a member of the This Is It collective, and runs the website studiomusic.fm.

Claudia Borfiga
SENSE AND SENSIBILITY
All of Claudia’s work is hand drawn combining detail with simple lines and strong narratives. There is often a playful subject matter teasing at the everyday. Her influences range from anatomical drawings to Egon Schiele, Frida Kahlo and Dr. Seuss.

Lucille Clerc
THE GREAT BEAUTY
Lucille is a French London based illustrator. She works mainly within the field of editorial design and illustration, occasionally also realising interior and exhibition spaces. Her personal work is mainly based on the endlessly inspiring architecture of her neighbourhood in London.

Concepción Studios
THE ROYAL TENENBAUMS
Patrick Concepción is the founder and Art Director of Concepción Studios, a studio that focuses on art direction and graphics for the entertainment industry, located in San Jose, California. Throughout his career he has reveled in designing for Lady Gaga, Paul McCartney and Muse.

Kate Gibb
ANNIE HALL
Kate Gibb has worked as a printmaker and illustrator for over fifteen years. The kind of printing she is inspired by relies on chance, hiccups and happy accidents. Commercially she is renowned for her music-related sleeve artwork, most notably for a long-standing relationship with The Chemical Brothers.

HelloVon
BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA
HelloVon is the award winning studio founded by London based illustrator and artist Von in 2006. Utilising a seamless and dynamic blend of traditional and digital mark making techniques he has accrued an international client list, been featured in publications around the world and become one of the industry's foremost contemporary portrait illustrators.

MOL
THE 400 BLOWS
Fred Higginson, founder of Print Club London, also works under the name of MOL (Ministry of Love). Alongside his role at the printing studio, Fred finds time to produce silk screen prints and on occasion sculptures. Fred’s techniques are as eclectic as his influences, working across mediums and using materials ranging from Play-Doh to the pencil.

Kate Moross
HAIRSPRAY
Kate Moross is a 26 year old London based creative, and is the director of Studio Moross. She has a fascination with three sided shapes, illegible typography and freeform lettering.

Mat Pringle
ROSEMARY'S BABY
Mat spends his time doing fantastical figurative illustrations often with obsessive attention to detail, working predominantly with dipping pen in ink.  In the last few years he has expanded into screen and lino-cut printing which has led to teaching a BRIT Kids course in Illustration and Printmaking at the BRIT School. He still draws dinosaurs only not quite as well.

Rose Stallard
MAD MAX 2
Rose Stallard, illustrator and Creative Director of Print Club, mixes up her own drawings with found images from across the board, injecting fanzine-like enthusiasm (and discernment). Clients include The Guardian, Fiction Records, Urban Outfitters, Dazed & Confused and Glastonbury.

Hattie Stewart
SPRING BREAKERS
Hattie Stewart is a young London based illustrator. A self-proclaimed ‘professional doodler’ her unique and playful style extends itself through art and fashion. Having worked with designers such as House Of Holland, Marc By Marc Jacobs and Adidas, she has also exhibited in Miami, L.A, Bangkok, New York, Berlin and London.

Holly Wales
TWO DAYS, ONE NIGHT
Holly Wales founded her illustration practice in 2006. Her work explores a variety of subject matter and is predominantly drawing-based. She works with multiple layers of colour and deconstructs forms to build dynamic compositions which play upon chance and process.

Caspar Williamson
GHOSTBUSTERS
Caspar Williamson is heavily involved in the UK printmaking scene, publishes books on the subject and has taught both corporate and educational workshops throughout the UK. He has also exhibited widely and is represented by several galleries.

Joe Wilson
A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS
Joe Wilson is an illustrator based in the UK specialising in highly detailed, hand-drawn illustrations and print. Working with a combination of pencil, ink and digital colour, Joe's work takes form as a hybrid of the traditional and contemporary.

Steve Wilson
WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS
Steve Wilson is an illustrator who lives and works in Brighton. He can often be found foraging through the local flea markets for obscure books and discarded paraphernalia to use as inspiration for his varied and experimental work which he generalises as ‘somewhere between pop and psychedelia’.

Cassandra Yap
GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES
Cassandra Yap is an artist and art director based in London. Fuelled by her love of pin ups, the female form and an unhealthy obsession with vintage erotica, her photomontage halftone style illustrations are dark, bold and humorous with a kinky edge.


Comment

Owen Van Spall

Greetings. I am a Film History MA graduate from Birkbeck University of London and a trained NCTJ qualified journalist. Apart from a long history of film and news writing for this site and various other publications, I am also a trained photographer with my own camera kit. I write mostly every day. Along the way I have picked up work experience at Sight & Sound, The Guardian, The Independent, The FT, The New Statesman, and more. I have written hard news stories, features, arranged and conducted interviews with celebrities, film directors and other major cultural figures, arranged photo shoots, and covered film festivals, conferences and events in the UK and abroad. If you wish to commission me or enquire about full-time opportunities please find my CV and contact details below. A physical portfolio of print only cuttings can also be provided.